Understanding and using the CPS Remote Controller

Authors: Dave Kuhlman <dkuhlman@rexx.com> <http://www.rexx.com/~dkuhlman>
Marc-Aurèle Darche
Revision: $Id$
Copyright: (C) Copyright 2005-2006 Nuxeo SAS. This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 as published by the Free Software Foundation. This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details. You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.

Abstract

This document describes the CPSRemoteController product. This product enables any XML-RPC clients (which includes Python scripts, Java programs, etc.) to remotely control a CPS site and its content.

Contents

1   Introducing CPSRemoteController

1.1   What is CPSRemoteController?

CPSRemoteController provides a way to remotely control a CPS portal in a platform-independent manner through XML-RPC.

Why you might want to use CPSRemoteController -- Some possible of benefits:

  • For remotely controlling a CPS portal. Since the protocol used by CPSRemoteController is XML-RPC and is usable across the Web, you can control your CPS site from anywhere that you have access to the web site through the Web. CPSRemoteController also features a RemoteControllerClient that makes it possible for a CPS portal to remotely control other CPS portals.
  • For controlling a CPS portal in a platform-independent manner, that is for example controlling CPS without using Python, the main programming language used in CPS. Because there is XML-RPC client support for a variety of languages, for example Java, C/C++, PHP, etc. in addition to Python. For more information on XML-RPC implementations see XML-RPC. Thus, You are likely to be able to write your client in the language of your choice and on the platform that fits your needs.
  • For task automation. You may be able to write scripts that automate tasks which would be tedious if done manually at your CPS site from within the Web browser. For example, you might be able to write a script that adds a batch of documents to your site or that adds a set of users to the site. Some of these tasks, however, may require extensions to CPSRemoteController.
  • If an application provides an XML-RPC interface, you might be able to control a CPS site from within that foreign application.

1.2   Where to find CPSRemoteController

CPSRemoteController is included in CPS since CPS 3.3.6. The latest version is also available through the Nuxeo SVN public repository http://svn.nuxeo.org/.

1.3   Installing CPSRemoteController

1.3.1   For CPS 3.4 and subsequent versions

Select the CPS RemoteController extension when you install a new CPS portal.

1.3.2   For CPS prior to CPS 3.4

Use portal_quickinstaller in the ZMI:

  1. In the ZMI, click on portal_quickinstaller in the left-hand panel.
  2. Click the checkbox next to CPSRemoteController.
  3. Click the Install button.

2   Using CPSRemoteController

There is already documentation directly in the code of CPSRemoteController. Each method is well documented in its purpose and use.

It is important to note that the present documentation lacks some new methods that have been added in CPSRemoteController, so checking the source code for existing methods is highly recommended.

Although you can read the in-line documentation in the source code, it may make for more convenient reading if you generate HTML documentation for the methods. We recommend using happydoc. Generate the documentation for CPSRemoteController using something like the following:

$ cd my_cps_site/Products/CPSRemoteController
$ happydoc RemoteControllerTool.py

By default, happydoc places the generated files in a directory named doc. happydoc may already be installed on your machine. If not and if you are on a Debian GNU/Linux machine, you can install happydoc with something like the following:

apt-get install python-happydoc

For help on other platforms, check the happydoc Web site.

2.1   An example built with xmlrpclib

Calling a method on CPSRemoteController is fairly easy. Here is an example based on the use of the standard Python module xmlrpclib that you can use as a template:

from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy
proxy = ServerProxy('http://username:password@thrush:8085/mysite/portal_remote_controller') # 1
path_to_doc = 'workspaces/members/username/document-1'
doc_def = {                                                                                 # 2
    'content': 'Test #1',
}
comments = 'CPSRemoteController test #1\n'
proxy.editDocument(path_to_doc, doc_def, comments)                                          # 3

Explanation:

  1. In the call that creates the proxy, change the user name, password, machine/location, port, and CPS site.
  2. Create any needed data structures for the specific method to be called. See the documentation below on each method. In this case, for the call to editDocument, we create a dictionary containing a key content whose value is new value for the content field in the document. Hint: Look in the ZMI (Zope Management Interface) /mysite/portal_schemas/document under the Schemas tab.
  3. Call the method, passing in the needed parameters. In this example, the parameters are (1) the path to the document to be modified, (2) a data structure containing the update, and (3) comments.

Note: Use of the ServerProxy class as described here is dependent on the specific implementation library used here, in particular xmlrpclib. There are other Python XML-RPC implementations for Python that might be better suited than xmlrpclib, for example see Creating XML-RPC Servers and Clients with Twisted. One deficiency with the xmlrpclib implementation is not be able to send XML-RPC queries through a proxy.

2.2   An example built with TwistedWeb

So, here is a client built on Twisted. Note that this implementation requires a replacement to and extension of several classes in twisted.web.xmlrpc from TwistedWeb. The extension supports the use of user IDs and passwords. By the time you read this, that extension may already be in the distribution of TwistedWeb. Here are those replacement classes and a sample client that you can use as a template for your Twisted clients:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
import base64, urlparse
from twisted.web import xmlrpc
from twisted.internet import reactor, defer


class QueryProtocol(xmlrpc.QueryProtocol):
    def connectionMade(self):
        self.sendCommand('POST', self.factory.url)
        self.sendHeader('User-Agent', 'Twisted/XMLRPClib')
        self.sendHeader('Host', self.factory.host)
        if self.factory.authString is not None:
            cred = base64.encodestring(self.factory.authString)
            self.sendHeader('Authorization', 'Basic ' + cred[:-1])
        self.sendHeader('Content-type', 'text/xml')
        self.sendHeader('Content-length', str(len(self.factory.payload)))
        self.endHeaders()
        self.transport.write(self.factory.payload)


class QueryFactory(xmlrpc.QueryFactory):
    protocol = QueryProtocol
    def __init__(self, url, host, method, authString=None, *args):
        self.authString = authString
        xmlrpc.QueryFactory.__init__(self, url, host, method, *args)


class Proxy:
    """A Proxy for making remote XML-RPC calls.
    Pass the URL of the remote XML-RPC server to the constructor.
    Use proxy.callRemote('foobar', *args) to call remote method
    'foobar' with *args.
    """
    def __init__(self, url):
        parts = urlparse.urlparse(url)
        self.url = urlparse.urlunparse(('', '')+parts[2:])
        self.auth = None
        if self.url == "":
            self.url = "/"
        if ':' in parts[1]:
            if '@' in parts[1]:
                self.auth, address = parts[1].split('@')
            else:
                address = parts[1]
                self.authHost = None
            self.host, self.port = address.split(':')
            if self.auth is not None:
                self.authHost = '@'.join([self.auth, self.host])
            self.port = int(self.port)
        else:
            self.host, self.port = parts[1], None
        self.secure = parts[0] == 'https'

    def callRemote(self, method, *args):
        factory = QueryFactory(self.url, self.host,
                               method, self.auth, *args)
        if self.secure:
            from twisted.internet import ssl
            reactor.connectSSL(self.host, self.port or 443,
                               factory, ssl.ClientContextFactory())
        else:
            reactor.connectTCP(self.host, self.port or 80, factory)
        return factory.deferred


class Test:

    def printValue(self, value):
        value.sort()
        print 'Items:'
        for item in value:
            print '    %s' % item

    def printError(self, error):
        print 'error', error

    def getData(self, user, password):
        url = 'http://%s:%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
            (user, password, )
        self.proxy = Proxy(url)
        arg1 = 'workspaces/members/%s' % user
        d = self.proxy.callRemote('listContent', arg1)
        d.addCallbacks(self.printValue, self.printError)
        return d


def test_listContent():
    g = Test()
    user = 'user1'
    password = 'user1_password'
    d = g.getData(user, password)
    user = 'user2'
    password = 'user2_password'
    d = g.getData(user, password)
    reactor.callLater(1, reactor.stop)
    reactor.run()


if __name__ == '__main__':
    test_listContent()

Notes:

  • Classes QueryProtocol, QueryFactory, and Proxy replace classes in twisted/web/xmlrpc.py. These replacements add the capability to pass a user name and password to the XML-RPC server. You will want to check your TwistedWeb distribution to determine if that capability has already been added.
  • Methods Test.printValue is the callback that will be called and will be passed the value returned by the XML-RPC server. In our case, the server is a CPS site.
  • Method Test.getData creates a proxy, calls method callRemote to create a deferred object, adds two callback functions to that deferred object, then returns that object.
  • Function test_listContent creates an instance of our Test class, calls method getData in that class to obtain the deferred object, and schedules it to be run.

More information on the Twisted programming paradigm and the use of deferred objects can be found at Twisted Documentation. For more on the use of XML-RPC with Twisted see Creating XML-RPC Servers and Clients with Twisted.

2.3   An example built with Java

For accessing CPS through XML-RPC in Java, one can use Apache XML-RPC Java library:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.net.URL;

import java.util.List;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Vector;

import org.apache.xmlrpc.XmlRpc;
import org.apache.xmlrpc.XmlRpcClient;
import org.apache.xmlrpc.XmlRpcException;

public class RemoteControl {

    private XmlRpcClient client;

    static {
        XmlRpc.setEncoding("UTF-8");
    }

    public RemoteControl(String url) throws MalformedURLException {
        this(new URL(url));
    }

    public RemoteControl(URL url) {
        client = new XmlRpcClient(url);
        client.setBasicAuthentication("manager", "xxx");
    }

    // ------------------- XMLRPC API -------------------

    public List listContent(String docRelativePath)
        throws XmlRpcException, IOException {
            Vector params = new Vector();
            params.addElement(docRelativePath);
            System.out.println("Executing RPC method listContent() " + params);
            return (List) client.execute("listContent", params);
        }

    public Object getDocumentState(String docRelativePath)
        throws XmlRpcException, IOException {
            Vector params = new Vector();
            params.addElement(docRelativePath);
            System.out.println("getDocumentState() " + params);
            return client.execute("getDocumentState", params);
        }

    public String createDocument(String type, String folderRelPath,
            Object docMap, int position)
        throws XmlRpcException, IOException {
            Vector params = new Vector();
            params.addElement(type);
            params.addElement(docMap);
            params.addElement(folderRelPath);
            params.addElement(new Integer(position));
            System.out.println("createDocument() " + params);
            return (String) client.execute("createDocument", params);
        }

    // --------------------------------------------------

    /**
     * The method in charge of analyzing the parameters given to the program and
     * executing the corresponding actions.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            String remoteControllerAddr =
                "http://myserver.net:8080/cps/portal_remote_controller";
            RemoteControl ctrl = new RemoteControl(remoteControllerAddr);

            List list = ctrl.listContent("workspaces");
            System.out.println("\nWorkspaces content: " + list);

            Object res;
            HashMap metadata = new HashMap();
            metadata.put("Title", "Test Document");
            metadata.put("Description", "Test Document Description");
            metadata.put("file", "Bla bla ...".getBytes());
            metadata.put("file_name", "test.txt");
            res = ctrl.createDocument("File", "workspaces", metadata, 0);
            System.out.println("\nDocument created: " + res);

            res = ctrl.getDocumentState("workspaces/test-document");
            System.out.println("\nDocument state: " + res);

        } catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println("main() " + ex);
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}

A file RemoteControl.java is provided in the doc directory.

2.4   Preliminary hints and suggestions

2.4.1   Object IDs

For documents, CPS takes the document title, performs a conversion on the title, then uses that converted string for the object ID. You must use the document ID, not the title, to perform operations on existing objects.

How to learn the ID of an object -- You can learn the ID of a document, folder, etc in one of the following ways:

  • The last part of the URL of your document is its ID.
  • In the ZMI, by looking at the object, for example, look under:
    • my_cps_site/sections
    • my_cps_site/workspaces
  • In your CPS portal, by clicking on the "Folder contents" action, selecting the object, then clicking on "Change object id".

The function used to perform the conversion from title to ID is: generateId in my_zope_instance/Products/CPSUtil/id.py. You may want to read the documentation in the source and the source itself for that function if you have questions about this conversion process.

Although the behavior of generateId can be modified by parameters, here are the rules that generateId follows at the time of writing:

  • The allowable characters are letters, digits, underscores, and dashes.
  • Blanks are replaced with dashes. Most other un-allowed characters are removed. Multiple, contiguous blanks are replaced with a single dash.
  • Upper case letters are converted to lower case.
  • Words are not cut.
  • The generated ID has a maximum length.

3   Method Descriptions

This section describes each of the methods exposed and supported by CPSRemoteController.

The code examples that we give are implement on top of xmlrpclib.

3.1   Documents

3.1.1   Creating, editing, deleting documents

3.1.1.1   changeDocumentPosition

Prototype:

changeDocumentPosition(
        self,
        rpath,
        step,
        )

Change the position of the document within its containing folder. For example, this operation changes the order in which documents are displayed when you click on "Folder contents" in your site. Warning: This method can only be called on ordered folders and would produce errors if called, for example, on BTreeFolders.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "sections/section1/doc1" or "sections/folder/doc2". Remember that the title and ID of the object may be different. See section Object IDs for more on this.
  • step (an integer) is the increment to be added to the target document's current position.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized("You need the ChangeSubobjectsOrder permission.")

3.1.1.2   createDocument

Prototype:

createDocument(
        self,
        portal_type,
        doc_def,
        folder_rpath,
        position=-1,
        comments="",
        )

Create document with the given portal_type with data from the given data dictionary.

The method returns the rpath of the created document.

Parameters:

  • portal_type is the type of document to be created. In your CPS portal, click on the New action to get a list of document types that can be created in a particular folder. You can learn more about these document types in my_cps_site/portal_schemas in the ZMI.

  • doc_def (a dictionary) contains values to be inserted in the new object. The keys in the dictionary are the names of the properties in the new object and the values are the values assigned for each property. The following properties are always valid:

    • Title
    • Description

    You can learn about additional properties specific to each document type by looking in my_cps_site/portal_schemas in the ZMI, then clicking on a specific document definition.

  • folder_rpath (a string) is the path to the folder in which the document is to be created. An example is "workspaces/members/a_user_name".

  • position (an integer) is optional. It is used to specify the position of the new document within exiting documents in the folder. A value of zero places the new document at the top. A value of -1 (the default) places the document after all existing documents.

  • comments (a string) supplies optional comments.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the AddPortalContent permission." )

Examples -- These examples were copied from the in-line documentation, then reformatted and modified:

from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy
p = ServerProxy('http://manager:xxxxx@myserver.net:8080/cps/portal_remote_controller')

doc_def = {'Title': "The report from Monday meeting",
    'Description': "Another boring report"
    }
p.createDocument('File', doc_def, 'workspaces')

doc_def = {'Title': "The company hires",
    'Description': "The company goes well and hires"
    }
p.createDocument('News Item', doc_def, 'workspaces')

doc_def = {'Title': "The report from Monday meeting",
    'Description': "Another boring report"
    }
p.createDocument('File', doc_def, 'workspaces')

doc_def = {'Title': "The company hires",
    'Description': "The company goes well and hires"
    }
p.createDocument('News Item', doc_def, 'workspaces', 0)

from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy, Binary
f = open('MyImage.png', 'r')
binary = Binary(f.read())
f.close()
doc_def = {'Title': "The report from Monday meeting",
    'Description': "Another boring report",
    'file_name': "MyImage.png",
    'file': binary,
    }
p.createDocument('File', doc_def, 'workspaces')

doc_def = {'Title': "The company hires",
    'Description': "The company goes well and hires"
    }
p.createDocument('News Item', doc_def, 'workspaces', 2)

from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy, Binary
f = open('MyImage.png', 'r')
binary = Binary(f.read())
f.close()
doc_def = {'Title': "The report from Monday meeting",
    'Description': "Another boring report",
    'file_name': "MyImage.png",
    'file_key': 'file_zip',
    'file': binary,
    }
p.createDocument('File', doc_def, 'workspaces')

doc_def = {'Title': "The company hires",
    'Description': "The company goes well and hires"
    }
p.createDocument('News Item', doc_def, 'workspaces', 2)

And, here is one additional example. This one creates an object of type Document, adds some content in the document, and specifies the content format:

#
# Create new document in the user's private directory.
#
def test_createDocument(user, title, description):
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    content_template = '''\
Content:

- Title: %s

- Description: %s
'''
    content = content_template % (title, description, )
    doc_def = {'Title': title,
        'Description': description,
        'content': content,
        'content_format': 'rst',
        }
    doc_rpath = 'workspaces/members/%s' % user
    result = proxy.createDocument('Document', doc_def, doc_rpath)
    print 'result: "%s"' % result

Explanation:

  • We specify the values of the content and content_format properties. Your question at this point might be: (1) How did we learn the names/IDs of the properties for this document type? And, (2) how do we find out what values these properties can take. Here are a few guides to help you find out:

    • The property names -- In the above example, we created an object of type Document. So, in the ZMI, we look at my_cps_site/portal_schemas/document, then click on the "Schema" tab. What we see is a list of the IDs of the objects in any object of type Document.
    • The property values -- To learn this, first determine the widget type of the content property by looking in my_cps_site/portal_layouts/document/w__content in the ZMI. Once it has been determined that the type of the widget used to display content is CPSTextWidget, then look at the render method in class CPSTextWidget in my_zope_instance/Products/CPSSchemas/ExtendedWidgets.py. If you read that code, you will find that the format keys are "text", "rst", and "html".

    Hopefully, you will be able to do similar investigative work to learn about the properties of other object types.

3.1.1.3   deleteDocument

Prototype:

deleteDocument(self, rpath)

Delete the document with the given rpath.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the document to be deleted.

Exceptions

  • Unauthorized( "You need the DeleteObjects permission." )
  • KeyError - 'document-11' -- The document does not exist in the specified folder.

Example:

#
#     Delete a document.
#
def test_deleteDocument(user, title, description):
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    doc_rpath = 'workspaces/members/%s/%s' % (user, title, )
    print 'deleting -- doc_rpath: %s' % doc_rpath
    proxy.deleteDocument(doc_rpath)

3.1.1.4   deleteDocuments

Prototype:

deleteDocuments(self, rpaths)

Delete the documents corresponding to the given rpaths.

Parameters:

  • rpaths (a tuple or list of strings) contains the paths of the documents to be deleted.

Example:

#     Delete a set of documents.
#     The documents are specified as titles = 'doc1:doc2:doc3 ...'
#
def test_deleteDocuments(user, titles, description):
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    doc_rpaths = []
    title_list = titles.split(':')
    for title in title_list:
        rpath = 'workspaces/members/%s/%s' % (user, title, )
        doc_rpaths.append(rpath)
    print 'deleting -- doc_rpaths: %s' % doc_rpaths
    proxy.deleteDocuments(doc_rpaths)

3.1.1.5   deleteDocumentsInDirectory

deleteDocumentsInDirectory(self, rpath)

Delete the documents located in directory corresponding to the given rpath.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the directory containing the documents to be deleted.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the DeleteObjects permission." )

3.1.1.6   editDocument

Prototype:

editDocument(
        self,
        rpath,
        doc_def={},
        comments="",
        )

Modify the specified document with data from the given data dictionary.

Parameters:

  • doc_rpath (a string) is the path to the folder in which the document is to be created. An example is "workspaces/members/a_user_name/a_doc_id".
  • doc_def (a dictionary) contains values to be inserted in the new object. The keys in the dictionary are the names of the properties in the object and the values are the values assigned for each property. See section createDocument for more information on the contents of this dictionary.
  • comments (a string) supplies optional comments.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the ModifyPortalContent permission." )

Example:

#     Edit/modify the content of an existing document in the
#     user's private directory.
#
def test_editDocument(user, title, description):
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    content_template = '''\
This is edited content.

Content:

- Title: %s

- Description: %s
'''
    content = content_template % (title, description, )
    doc_def = {'Title': title,
        'Description': description,
        'content': content,
        'content_format': 'rst',
        }
    doc_rpath = 'workspaces/members/%s/%s' % (user, title, )
    position = 1
    comment = 'Comment for %s' % title
    print 'editing document -- doc_rpath: %s  doc_def: %s' % \
        (doc_rpath, doc_def, )
    result = proxy.editDocument(doc_rpath, doc_def, comment)
    print 'result: "%s"' % result

3.1.1.7   editOrCreateDocument

Prototype:

editOrCreateDocument(
        self,
        rpath,
        portal_type,
        doc_def,
        position=-1,
        comments="",
        )

Create or edit a document with the given portal_type with data from the given data dictionary.

The method returns the rpath of the created or edited document.

Parameters -- Same as for createDocument.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the ModifyPortalContent permission." )

3.1.2   Queries on documents

3.1.2.1   getDocumentHistory

Prototype:

getDocumentHistory(self, rpath)

Return the document history.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the document whose history is to be retrieved.

Example:

#     Get document history.
#
def test_getDocumentHistory(user, rpath):
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    print 'getting doc history -- user: %s  rpath: %s' % \
        (user, rpath, )
    history_simplified = proxy.getDocumentHistory(rpath)
    print 'history:'
    for action, time in history_simplified.items():
        print '    action: %s  time: %s' % (action, time, )

3.1.2.2   getDocumentState

Prototype:

getDocumentState(self, rpath)

Return the workflow state of the document specified by the given relative path.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "workspaces/doc1" or "sections/doc2".

3.1.2.3   getOriginalDocument

Prototype:

getOriginalDocument(self, rpath)

Return the path to the original document that was used to publish the document specified by the given path.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the published document and is of the form "sections/doc1".

3.1.2.4   getPublishedDocuments

Prototype:

getPublishedDocuments(self, rpath)

Return a list of rpaths of documents which are published versions of the document specified by the given path.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "workspaces/a_member/doc1".

3.1.2.5   isDocumentLocked

Prototype:

isDocumentLocked(self, rpath)

Return whether the document is locked (in the WebDAV sense) or not.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) -- The path to the document.

Example -- See lockDocument.

3.1.2.6   listContent

Prototype:

listContent(self, rpath)

Return a list of documents contained in the folder specified by the given relative path.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "workspaces" or "workspaces/members/some_member_name".

Example:

from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy

def test():
    proxy = ServerProxy('http://some_user:xxxxx@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller')
    workspaces = proxy.listContent('workspaces')
    folder_contents = proxy.listContent('workspaces/members/some_user')
    print 'folder_contents:'
    for count, item in enumerate(folder_contents):
        print '    %d. %s' % (count, item, )

test()

3.1.3   Controlling access to documents

3.1.3.1   deleteDocumentLocks

Prototype:

deleteDocumentLocks(self, rpath)

Delete all the locks owned by a user on the specified document.

Calling this method should be avoided but might be useful when a client application crashes and loses all the user locks.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the document whose locks are to be deleted.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the ModifyPortalContent permission." )

3.1.3.2   lockDocument

Prototype:

lockDocument(self, rpath)

Lock the document and return the associated lock token or return False if some problem occurs.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the document to be locked.

Example:

from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy

def test():
    proxy = ServerProxy('http://some_user:xxxxx@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller')
    rpath = 'workspaces/members/some_user/document-105'
    result = proxy.isDocumentLocked(rpath)
    print '1. result: %s' % result
    lock = proxy.lockDocument(rpath)
    result = proxy.isDocumentLocked(rpath)
    print '2. result: %s' % result
    proxy.unlockDocument(rpath, lock)
    result = proxy.isDocumentLocked(rpath)
    print '3. result: %s' % result

test()

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the ModifyPortalContent permission." )

3.1.3.3   unlockDocument

Prototype:

unlockDocument(self, rpath, lock_token)

Un-lock the document and return True if the operation succeeds, else return False.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is the path to the document to be locked.
  • lock_token is the token returned by a call to lockDocument.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the ModifyPortalContent permission." )

Example -- See lockDocument.

3.1.4   Publishing documents

3.1.4.1   acceptDocument

Prototype:

acceptDocument(
        self,
        rpath,
        comments="",
        )

Approve the document specified by the given relative path. This method performs the same operation as the Accept action under Object actions.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "sections/section1/doc1" or "sections/folder/doc2". Remember that the title and ID of the object may be different. See section Object IDs for more on this.
  • comments (a string) supplies optional comments.

As of this writing, CPSRemoteController does not expose a rejectDocument method. If you need that functionality, see section rejectDocument.

Exceptions:

  • Unauthorized( "You need the ModifyPortalContent permission." )

3.1.4.2   publishDocument

Prototype:

publishDocument(
        self,
        doc_rpath,
        rpaths_to_publish,
        wait_for_approval=False,
        comments="",
        )

Publish the document specified by the given relative path.

Parameters:

  • document_rpath (a string) is of the form "workspaces/doc1" or "workspaces/folder/doc2".
  • rpaths_to_publish (a dictionary) -- The dictionary keys are the rpath of where to publish the document. The rpath can be the rpath of a section or the rpath of a document. The dictionary values are either the empty string, "before", "after" or "replace". Those values have a meaning only if the rpath is the one of a document. "replace" is to be used so that the published document really replaces another document, be it folder or document. The targeted document is deleted and the document to published is inserted at the position of the now deleted targeted document.
  • wait_for_approval (a boolean) specifies whether the document must be approved (accepted) in order for it to move to the published state.
  • comments (a string) supplies optional comments.

3.1.4.3   unpublishDocument

Prototype:

unpublishDocument(self, rpath, comments="")

Unpublish the document specified by the given relative path.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "sections/doc1" or "sections/folder1/doc2".
  • comments (a string) supplies optional comments.

3.2   Roles and permissions

3.2.1   Queries

3.2.1.1   checkPermission

Prototype:

checkPermission(
        self,
        rpath,
        permission,
        )

Check the given permission for the current user on the given context.

Parameters:

  • rpath (a string) is of the form "sections/section1/doc1" or "sections/folder/doc2". Remember that the title and ID of the object may be different. See section Object IDs for more on this.
  • permission (a string) is the permission against which the document's permission is to be compared.

3.2.1.2   getLocalRoles

Prototype:

getLocalRoles(self, username, rpath)

Return the roles of the given user local to the specified context.

N.B.: This method doesn't know how to deal with blocked roles.

Parameters:

  • username (a string) is the name of a user.
  • rpath (a string) is the path to the document for which information is to be retrieved.

3.2.1.3   getRoles

Prototype:

getRoles(self, username)

Return the roles of the given user.

Parameters:

  • username (a string) is the name of a user.

Example:

#     Change document position.
#
def test_getRoles(username):
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (username, username, username, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    print 'getting user roles -- user: %s' % username
    roles = proxy.getRoles(username)
    print 'roles: %s' % roles

3.3   Managing members

3.3.1   Adding and deleting members

3.3.1.1   addMember

Prototype:

def addMember(self, user_id,
        user_password,
        user_roles=None,
        email='',
        first_name='',
        last_name='')

Add a new member to the portal.

Parameters:

  • user_id (a string) is the user ID for the new member.
  • user_password (a string) is the password for the new member.
  • user_roles (a tuple or list of strings) are the initial roles for the new member. The default is ('Member', ).
  • email (a string) is the email address for the new member.
  • first_name (a string) is the new member's first name.
  • last_name (a string) is the new member's last name.

Notes:

  • You will need to connect (through XMLRPC) with ManageUser or manager privileges in order to use this method.
  • The member's private directory does not seem to be created until the first time that the member logs on to the portal.
  • The code that actually does the work is in CMFCore.MembershipTool.addMember, if you need to read the source.

Example:

def test_addMember(user_id, user_password, first_name, last_name):
    user = 'manager'
    constr = 'http://%s:%s%s@thrush:8085/cps1/portal_remote_controller' % \
        (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    user_roles = ('Member',)
    email = '%s@somehost.com' % user_id
    proxy.addMember(user_id, user_password, user_roles, email,
        first_name, last_name)

3.3.1.2   deleteMembers

Prototype:

def deleteMembers(self, member_ids,
        delete_memberareas=1,
        delete_localroles=1)

Delete one or more members from the portal.

Parameters:

  • member_ids (a string or a list of strings) is the ID or a list of IDs of the members to be deleted.
  • delete_memberareas (a boolean), if true, specifies that the deleted member's private space should also be deleted.
  • delete_localroles (a boolean), if true, specifies that the local roles of the deleted members should also be deleted.

Notes:

  • You will need to connect (through XMLRPC) with ManageUser or manager privileges in order to use this method.
  • The code that actually does the work is in CMFCore.MembershipTool.deleteMembers, if you need to read the source.

Example:

def test_deleteMembers(user_ids):
    user = 'manager'
    constr = Constr % (user, user, user, )
    proxy = ServerProxy(constr)
    # Convert the user IDs into a list of strings.
    user_ids = user_ids.split()
    # Delete the members, but do not delete their private spaces.
    proxy.deleteMembers(user_ids, False)

4   Adding New Methods to CPSRemoteController

Extensions to CPSRemoteController -- You may be able to implement additional methods not currently supported by CPSRemoteController.

For our example, we will implement a method that will create a new user.

4.1   Advance planning

Preparing for upgrades to CPSRemoteController -- We will want to preserve our added methods when CPSRemoteController is upgraded. Therefore, we'd like to put our additional methods in a separate class and in a separate module.

There are 2 ways to achieve this:

  1. By extending the RemoteControllerTool class and installing this new tool instead of the original RemoteControllerTool tool.
  2. By monkey-patching the RemoteControllerTool. This is easier and faster, but less clean.

4.2   Licensing

Since you are extending CPSRemoteController and since that code is covered by the GNU General Public License, you will need to use a GNU GPL compatible license for distributing your extensions.

4.3   getComplexDocumentHistory

The first example is trivial. It involves simply modifying the existing implementation of getDocumentHistory so that it returns a little more information.

Here is the old, existing implementation:

security.declareProtected(View, 'getDocumentHistory')
def getDocumentHistory(self, rpath):
    """Return the document history.
    """
    proxy = self.restrictedTraverse(rpath)
    history = proxy.getContentInfo(proxy=proxy, level=3)['history']
    LOG(glog_key, DEBUG, "history = %s" % history)
    # A simplified value of the history so that it can be transported over
    # XML-RPC.
    history_simplified = {}
    for event in history:
        history_simplified[event['action']] = event['time_str']
    LOG(glog_key, DEBUG, "history_simplified = %s" % history_simplified)
    return history_simplified

And, here is the new, extended implementation:

#
# Start additional methods
#
security.declareProtected(View, 'getComplexDocumentHistory')
def getComplexDocumentHistory(self, rpath):
    """Return the document history.
    """
    proxy = self.restrictedTraverse(rpath)
    history = proxy.getContentInfo(proxy=proxy, level=3)['history']
    LOG(glog_key, DEBUG, "history = %s" % history)
    # A simplified value of the history so that it can be transported over
    # XML-RPC.
    history_simplified = {}
    history_complex = []                          # [1]
    for event in history:                         # [2]
        history_simplified[event['action']] = event['time_str']
        history_complex.append((event['action'], event['time_str'], ))
    LOG(glog_key, DEBUG, "history_simplified = %s" % history_simplified)
    return history_simplified, history_complex    # [3]
#
# End additional methods
#

Notes:

  1. We create a new variable which will hold our richer history information.
  2. For each item in the history, we add a tuple to history_complex containing two items: (1) the modification action and (2) the modification time.
  3. We return a tuple (XML-RPC will convert it to a list) containing both the simple and the more complete history information.

We could further modify getComplexDocumentHistory so that it returns additional information from the event object. A hint -- The event object is a dictionary that contains the following keys:

  • dest_container
  • comments
  • rpath
  • language_revs
  • workflow_id
  • actor
  • time
  • action
  • review_state
  • time_str

4.4   rejectDocument

This is another simple example. We merely copy the acceptDocument method, then change "accept" to "reject". Here is our new method:

#
# Start additional methods
#
security.declareProtected(View, 'rejectDocument')
def rejectDocument(self, rpath, comments=""):
    """Approve the document specified by the given relative path.

    rpath is of the form "sections/doc1" or "sections/folder/doc2".
    """
    wftool = self.portal_workflow
    proxy = self.restrictedTraverse(rpath)
    if not _checkPermission(ModifyPortalContent, proxy):
        raise Unauthorized("You need the ModifyPortalContent permission.")
    context = proxy
    workflow_action = 'reject'
    allowed_transitions = wftool.getAllowedPublishingTransitions(context)
    LOG(glog_key, DEBUG, "allowed_transitions = %s" % str(allowed_transitions))
    wftool.doActionFor(context, workflow_action, comment=comments)
#
# End additional methods
#